Votre navigateur ne supporte pas HTML5 Canvas.

GRIZZLY BEAR

DID YOU KNOW: Grizzlies are incorrectly portrayed as voracious predators. In fact, they are normally reclusive creatures that act aggressively toward humans only in specific situations; usually when they feel startled or threatened by human actions, generally around bear cubs or food sources.

THE THREAT: The biggest threat to the grizzly bear’s survival is loss of habitat due to human activities, including resource extraction, infrastructure development (such as roads), and encroachment of human settlements. These activities also fragment the landscape, isolating small populations and their breeding potential. In Canada, only 7% of the grizzly bears’ range is protected by law.

CPAWS chapters actively working to help protect this species:

CPAWS British Columbia, CPAWS Southern Alberta

×

CARIBOU

(Woodland, Barren Ground, Peary, and Porcupine)

DID YOU KNOW: Caribou are the largest land-based mammal in North America to still live in large social groups and embark on extensive migrations. Herds of travelling caribou on the Northern tundra will suddenly transform a seemingly empty landscape to one alive with their footfalls and calls.

THE THREAT: Caribou are vulnerable to extensive fragmentation of their landscape from logging and other forms of development like mining and oil and gas extractions. These disturbances expose them to more predators and decreases their access to food sources.

CPAWS chapters actively working to help protect this species:

CPAWS Yukon, CPAWS NWT, CPAWS Wildlands League, CPAWS Ottawa Valley, CPAWS Quebec, CPAWS Northern Alberta

×

SAGE GROUSE

DID YOU KNOW: The Greater Sage Grouse, the largest grouse species in North America, lives in native grasslands habitat. With the disappearance of 80% of Saskatchewan’s grasslands, there are few Sage Grouse left. Just 13 male sage-grouse were recorded in Alberta in 2011, and only 35 in Saskatchewan.

THE THREAT: The only remaining areas of native prairie have some degree of protection; however, these lands are open to oil and gas development, and most do not have native-grass based management plans in place. CPAWS is working to help establish better protection for the Sage Grouse and their habitat, both in terms of allowed land uses and good management plans. We are undertaking direct action on high priority sites of known interest and importance that are currently under threat.

CPAWS chapters actively working to help protect this species:

CPAWS Saskatchewan

×

LYNX

DID YOU KNOW: The Canada lynx needs a large territory to survive and it is well adapted to deep snow with paws that can expand as wide as 10 centimetres. These “snowshoe-like” paws are what allow lynx to move quickly and easily over snowy terrain.

THE THREAT: The Canada lynx is listed as an endangered species (species at risk) in New Brunswick. It has declined in many areas due to habitat loss from human settlement, large-scale industrial use, and roads. In New Brunswick, the Canada lynx is also dealing with increasing pressure from other carnivore competitors, such as coyote and bobcats, that seem to be less disturbed by human settlements, and are competing with lynx for their main food source, snowshoe hares.

CPAWS chapters actively working to help protect this species:

CPAWS New Brunswick

×