What we do

Our vision is to keep at least half of Canada's public land and water wild — forever. We focus on protecting many important areas of Canada's wilderness. Find out about the issues we work on below, or click on a link to the right to more about where we work.

Issues

Wildlife

Wildlife

We focus on protecting large tracts of land, oceans and great freshwater lakes so species like grizzlies, woodland caribou and wolverine have room to roam, and whales and fish can thrive. Learn more about Wildlife
Parks

Parks

Canada has one of the oldest and most extensive parks systems in the world. CPAWS advocates for new parks and acts as a watchdog to ensure that existing ones are well-managed. With pressures on our wilderness growing, creating more parks and ensuring existing ones are well-funded and protected is more important than ever. Learn more about Parks
Forests

Forests

From the vast northern Boreal forest to the temperate forests stretching across Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes, Canada is home to some of the largest unbroken tracts of forest on the planet. CPAWS’ goal is to conserve at least half of our Boreal forests, and to create a network of large conservation areas within the temperate Eastern Woodlands of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec and Ontario.

Learn more about Forests
Oceans: Dare to be Deep

Oceans: Dare to be Deep

While Canada boasts one of the largest ocean territories in the world, only 1.3% of it is protected through meaningful long-term conservation measures. The federal government has committed to establishing networks of marine protected areas covering at least 10% of our oceans by 2020. Progress by all of our governments on creating new marine protected areas needs to speed up if we are going to meet that commitment.

Learn more about Oceans: Dare to be Deep
Grasslands

Grasslands

Grasslands are some of the most unique ecosystems in the world, but are also considered the most threatened, with the highest concentration of species at risk. CPAWS chapters in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan are working to protect these unique landscapes and their rich biodiversity. Learn more about Grasslands

Current campaigns

The Rouge: Getting it right for Canada’s first National Urban Park

The proposed Rouge National Urban Park in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is an opportunity to protect and restore an important ecosystem in Canada’s largest urban centre, and to provide millions of Canadians with the chance to directly experience wild nature without leaving the city. In such a busy urban landscape, assuring the long-term health of the park will require strong management tools that prioritize conservation and provide clear guidance for visitor use.

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Caribou and You

By protecting caribou, you are protecting your future. Caribou need the intact ecosystems that provide the fresh air and clean water we need to survive. By saving caribou's remaining habitat in Canada’s Boreal forests and Northern tundra, we are protecting our health and a way of life for Indigenous peoples, and slowing the effects of climate change.

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Take the Ambassador pledge!

Join our national team of conservation champions!

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Help save Manitoba’s Naosap Herd

Woodland caribou are threatened with extinction. These spectacular creatures need immense sections of unbroken boreal forest to find enough food and avoid predators. Caribou ranges are continually disappearing as human activity, including logging and mining, push northward throughout Canada – Manitoba is no exception.

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Save Gros Morne National Park

Gros Morne National Park protects 1,805 square kilometres of western Newfoundland’s coastal lowlands and towering Long Range Mountains and is one of Canada’s most treasured national parks. Gros Morne was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in recognition of its unique geological features and spectacular natural beauty. In 2013 the park was threatened by a proposal to drill and frack for oil metres from the boundary. After a huge public outcry this proposal was stopped, but Gros Morne is still vulnerable to future industrial proposals. That's why CPAWS is working with concerned local community members, businesses and prominent Canadians to encourage the federal and provincial governments to create a permanent buffer zone around the park to protect it from harmful industrialization.

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Thaidene Nene: Protecting the East Arm of Great Slave Lake

CPAWS is supporting creation of a huge new protected area by the local Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation and Parks Canada around and beyond the shores of East Arm of Great Slave Lake, called Thaidene Nene, meaning “the Land of the Ancestors” in Denesuline.
Learn more about this very special place at the CPAWS NWT chapter site.

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Stop the massive expansion of the Lake Louise ski resort

On June 1, Parks Canada released draft Site Guidelines for the Lake Louise Ski Area for Future Development and Use. The private ski hill operator is proposing to DOUBLE the capacity and infrastructure of the ski resort.

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Protect Cape Breton Highlands Park’s natural beauty

The Never Forgotten National Memorial Foundation is proposing to develop a seven-story statue within Cape Breton Highlands National Park at Green Cove to commemorate Canadian soldiers who fought and died overseas. It may be a worthy cause, but CPAWS is concerned about the sheer size of the project and its location inside a national park.

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I Love Parks

Canada’s parks protect extraordinary wild places where people can connect with nature. But our parks’ future isn’t secure, and they need your voice!

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Create a park in the South Okanagan-Similkameen

At the bottom of soggy, lush British Columbia, there exists a strange world full of desert snakes, prickly sagebrush, Bighorn sheep and birds that dare to nest on grass. This South Okanagan-Similkameen area of B.C. remains desert-like, born of very warm summers and little rainfall. But the Okanagan is disappearing fast, snapped up by humans wanting wineries, retirement homes and urban conveniences. As a result, a third of British Columbia's species at risk now must cling to this vanishing landscape. Protection is urgent.

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Protect Canada’s Species at Risk!

According to COSEWIC, the scientific body that identifies and advises the federal government on species at risk, there are 650 species listed at risk of extinction in Canada, and the list continues to grow each year. As threats to our environment grow, we need stronger, not weaker, laws to protect the plants and animals that are struggling to survive across Canada. However, CPAWS is concerned that protection for species at risk is getting weaker.

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Keep the Flathead Wild

The Flathead Valley, in southeastern British Columbia, is one of the most biologically important places on earth. Despite its relatively untouched state and the mining and oil and gas development ban announced by the B.C. government in February 2010, this area – and the species found here – are still urgently in need of permanent protection.

Learn more at CPAWS BC

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Take action for Alberta’s endangered caribou

The Alberta government has auctioned off more than 2,000 hectares of caribou habitat to energy development. These new licenses will impact the habitat of mountain and boreal caribou, listed as endangered and threatened respectively under the Canadian Species at Risk Act. Recovery strategies developed for each type of caribou call for urgent action by provincial land managers.

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Implementing the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

CPAWS is playing a lead role in this ambitious agreement signed by environmental groups and forestry companies in 2010 that focuses on conserving caribou habitat and protecting important areas within 72 million hectares of Boreal forest.

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Protect the Yukon’s Peel watershed

The Yukon’s Peel River watershed is one of the largest and most beautiful intact natural areas left in North America. Mining and oil and gas extraction threaten to fragment this stunning landscape and harm its delicate ecological balance.

Learn more at Protect Peel.

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Where we work:

CPAWS works across Canada. Find out more about why what we're doing in these major areas:

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WE GET RESULTS

Here are some of the recent conservation gains you've helped us make.