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Articles by Éric Hébert-Daly

Eric has been CPAWS’ National Executive Director since April 2009. He was previously Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer for one of Canada’s major political parties. Éric is fluently bilingual, a graduate of Concordia University’s School of Community and Public Affairs, and a Certified Lay Worship Leader for the United Church. He has worked with municipal, regional and national groups across Canada and has focussed his attention on social justice, ecological and human rights issues throughout his career. Éric is an avid cyclist and hiker and has travelled extensively throughout Canada, with a particular interest in remote and northern regions from Labrador to Inuvik. He enjoys canoeing, cross-country skiing and camping, as well as his home life shared with his partner on the north edge of Gatineau Park near Ottawa.

What gets under my skin


Undermining natural ecosystems in order to create economic prosperity has some serious long-term implications. It would be like a family taking their whole earnings for the month and going on a vacation instead of paying their mortgage. It catches up to you. The planetary household has a finite budget and no credit cards to carry a balance. Let’s have a rational discussion about how to sustain and encourage an abundance of life for our entire household of living creatures, of which humans are but one.

Is the Federal Government Silencing Charities? Or is Canadian charitable law just out-dated?


The law needs to change to provide charities with the unambiguous right to participate in public policy work and to help shape government decisions. The law needs to be modernized from a 19th century perspective on charities to a 21st century model that encourages expertise, public participation and law-making to work together in the public interest. This change is also in the interest of governments who might be subject to criticism for appearing to be unfairly targeting charities that do not share their perspectives.

A look back at 2014


2014 kept us busy protecting more of Canada’s amazing wilderness. But I’ll be honest, until a couple of months ago, we were feeling somewhat discouraged.

Historic legal decision on Peel Land Use Plan


Yesterday, the Yukon Supreme Court issued a decision about a lawsuit concerning the Peel Watershed that was launched by two local first nations, CPAWS and the Yukon Conservation Society. Justice Ron Veale has ruled that the Yukon government must honour a seven-year process that led to the Final Land Use Plan for the Peel Watershed in 2011, which stated that approximately 80% of the 67,400 km2 area will be protected in perpetuity from industrial development.

The business case for nature is strong


They’re beautiful, awe-inspiring and breathtaking. And in addition to the benefits parks have on our physical and mental health, they have hard economic value, as well.

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